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Non-Energy Benefits/Non-Energy Impacts (NEBs/NEIs) and their role & values in cost-effectiveness tests: State of Maryland

Skumatz Non-energy benefits in California
States across the nation are reconsidering the definition and design of cost-effectiveness test procedures used in the energy efficiency regulatory arena, including the State of Maryland.

Twenty years of research and measurement of traditionally-omitted program impacts, or non-energy benefits (NEBs), have provided increasingly robust and consistent results – results that are suitable for regulators, utilities, and interveners to explore options for updating cost-effectiveness test methodologies to better inform and address potential biases in program and portfolio decision-making. The literature on NEBs now consists of more than 300 studies of various types, and more than a dozen states currently include some NEBs-related treatment in their regulatory benefit-cost testing procedures.

Author/Org: 
Lisa Skumatz, Skumatz Economic Research Associates
Year: 
2014
Categories: 
Program Design and Budgets
Tags: 
Maryland

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